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Tips to Boost Sterile Processing Technician Training & Outcomes

Sterile processing (SP) professionals are in high demand these days due to a mix of retirement, transitioning to other career fields and the so called “Great Resignation” that was largely spurred by the pandemic. It’s an eye-opening development and one that should make every health care organization take notice because of an essential fact: the critically important work that takes place in the sterile processing department (SPD) remains and must be performed by well-trained, qualified and dedicated professionals. 

What’s on the Horizon for HDO Sterilization Guidance?

This increased transport distance brings up new concerns and issues that are not already addressed in the transport section of ST79. The goal of this new TIR is to introduce best practice guidance for transporting clean, disinfected, sterilized, and soiled devices across longer distances, including addressing requirements for the transport vehicles used to transport the devices. For regular updates about this developing technical information report, check aami.org.

ASCA Recognizes Physicians for Outstanding Service

During ASCA’s annual conference in Dallas this year, the association recognized two physicians with its 2022 Nap Gary Award for Lifetime Achievement in the ASC Community: Thomas M. Deas Jr., MD, and Peter Daly, MD. Both men exemplify the long-standing dedication to the ASC community, leadership qualities and high moral and ethical standards the award was created to recognize. Each also contributed in unique ways to advancing the ASC care model.

Take Steps Toward a Healthier Lifestyle

Improving your diet, exercising regularly, taking a daily supplement and getting enough restorative sleep are all important steps to overall wellness. Work to incorporate each step into your daily routine until you reach your goal of good health, and find more health-conscious tips at eLivingToday.com. 

COVID Orphanhood Impacts Thousands

COVID Orphanhood Impacts Thousands

By Family Features

One U.S. child loses a parent or caregiver for every four COVID-19 deaths, a new modeling study published today in Pediatrics reveals. The findings illustrate orphanhood as a hidden and ongoing secondary tragedy caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and emphasizes that identifying and caring for these children throughout their development is a necessary and urgent part of the pandemic response – both for as long as the pandemic continues, as well as in the post-pandemic era.

From April 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021, data suggest that more than 140,000 children under age 18 in the United States lost a parent, custodial grandparent or grandparent caregiver who provided the child’s home and basic needs, including love, security and daily care. Overall, the study shows that approximately 1 out of 500 children in the United States has experienced COVID-19-associated orphanhood or death of a grandparent caregiver. There were racial, ethnic and geographic disparities in COVID-19-associated death of caregivers: children of racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 65% of those who lost a primary caregiver due to the pandemic.

Children’s lives are permanently changed by the loss of a mother, father or grandparent who provided their homes, basic needs and care. Loss of a parent is among the adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) linked to mental health problems; shorter schooling; lower self-esteem; sexual risk behaviors; and increased risk of substance abuse, suicide, violence, sexual abuse and exploitation.

“Children facing orphanhood as a result of COVID is a hidden, global pandemic that has sadly not spared the United States,” said Susan Hillis, CDC researcher and lead author of the study. “All of us – especially our children – will feel the serious immediate and long-term impact of this problem for generations to come. Addressing the loss that these children have experienced – and continue to experience – must be one of our top priorities, and it must be woven into all aspects of our emergency response, both now and in the post-pandemic future.”

The study was a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Imperial College London, Harvard University, Oxford University, and the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Published in the Oct. 7 issue of the journal Pediatrics, it was jointly led by CDC’s COVID Response and Imperial College London, and partly funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as Imperial College London.

For more information, visit www.nih.gov.

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